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A place to discuss different tools we use to keep our cars running.

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 #305851  by Bill Putney
 
Maybe some of you have seen this or something similar - I never had until Pascal (Minotu) posted the youtube link (in this thread: http://300mclub.org/forums/viewtopic.ph ... 50#p305850):

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012S ... wyou00f-20

Showing it being used (video could have been a bit shorter, but it is a good demonstration) - looks like it should work on our engines:

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 #307955  by Bill Putney
 
That's what *SHE* said.
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 #308131  by hrmwrm
 
pretty interesting. couldn't use a standard spring compressor on them.
although for tear down, i have for years just used a socket and a rubber mallet to pop the keepers. don't forget the rag.
suppose it only works by hand for ohc engines. the old pushrod springs would be quite a struggle by hand to fight against.
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 #308133  by Bill Putney
 
hrmwrm wrote:pretty interesting. couldn't use a standard spring compressor on them.
although for tear down, i have for years just used a socket and a rubber mallet to pop the keepers...
Interesting. So the keepers must jump out of their position when you whack it - maybe not the first time, but a couple of whacks generally does it?
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 #308274  by hrmwrm
 
yes, they just "pop" out. sometimes the first time, sometimes a couple hits. just make sure you have a good grip on the socket. if it jumps up too much, the keepers will go flying.
takes a good hit, and a good weighted mallet. some might find it easier with a 2lb steel mallet. although you still need the proper tools for re-assembly.
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 #308294  by Bill Putney
 
This is the easiest to use - called a "one man valve spring compressor" because you literally don't need a helper for removal or installation: http://www.ebay.com/itm/One-Man-Operati ... 069wt_1170

I bought one for my 2.7L timing chain replacement several years ago - also works for 3.2/3.5. IIRC, I paid $70 or $80 or so back then - as with eveything, price has crept up (currently north of $100). It is a good knock-off of the Chrysler valve spring compressor special tool.

If auction has expired, you can pretty much always find a current ebay auction by searching "one man valve spring compressor Chrysler". Forget trying to use the compressed air-to-spark plug hole adapter hose that comes with it - the quick-connect compressed-air end is apparently some third-world standard design - fits no standard coupler in U.S. (I tried all available). I hightly recommend using the "stuff the cylinder with string" method of holding the valves up instaed of compressed air anyway.
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 #308310  by hrmwrm
 
wonder if that would've worked on that hemi i had to replace a valve spring in. used one of those 2 jaw style compressors and air to hold the valve.
although their name is kinda funny in that almost all tools are 1 man operations for the job.
i could see where that one would have trouble fitting under tight cowl spaces.
looks simple enough to use for in place heads.
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 #308339  by Bill Putney
 
hrmwrm wrote:wonder if that would've worked on that hemi i had to replace a valve spring in. used one of those 2 jaw style compressors and air to hold the valve.
although their name is kinda funny in that almost all tools are 1 man operations for the job...
Oh - I didn't know that. I figured it would take too much force and mental concentration with a generic pry-type spring compressor to also be looking at and manipulating the keepers at the same time with the other hand. Maybe that's the difference between a pro and a DIY'er. However, it is *very* close quarters around the valve springs on these engines, so even if you found a traditional pry type to fit, it might be difficult. The Chrsyler special tool is like this, so maybe it helps to have be able to fiddle with the keepers, etc. while the spring is held compressed.
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 #308359  by hrmwrm
 
the one i used on the hemi was similar to a battery terminal puller. not much else would've fit. it was under the brake booster. lots of room for most of the other ones, and then you could always pull the booster for more clearance i guess. lots of different tools that work for these things, and each have their place. still better than pulling a head.

so, what holds down the one man one? a couple of valve cover bolts? how adaptable is it for heads other than the v6 chryslers?
i do kinda like the simplicity of the first tool.
although more of these tools are becoming diy tools. with parts becoming cheaper than labour, it's cheaper for a shop to just get a used head than replace bent/burnt valves nowadays.
but for the diy'er, it's cheaper to buy the tool and valves than to have a shop do it. only thing you might need to farm out would be seat grinding if necessary.
but that woul have been a cost from the shop anyways to rebuild the head.
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 #308368  by Bill Putney
 
hrmwrm wrote:...so, what holds down the one man one? a couple of valve cover bolts?
Cam bearing block bolts.
how adaptable is it for heads other than the v6 chryslers?
Not too sure. I would think it's pretty universal.
i do kinda like the simplicity of the first tool.
although more of these tools are becoming diy tools. with parts becoming cheaper than labour, it's cheaper for a shop to just get a used head than replace bent/burnt valves nowadays.
but for the diy'er, it's cheaper to buy the tool and valves than to have a shop do it. only thing you might need to farm out would be seat grinding if necessary.
but that woul have been a cost from the shop anyways to rebuild the head.
So far in my 40+ years of driving and DIY'ing, I've only had to have head work done one time (daughter's car lost its coolant and warped the head). The reason I bought the "one man" valve spring compressor (also called overhead valve spring compressor) was for replacing the valve stem seals in my 2.7 (while doing the timing chain, water pump, and oil pump).
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 #308391  by hrmwrm
 
So far in my 40+ years of driving and DIY'ing, I've only had to have head work done one time (daughter's car lost its coolant and warped the head). The reason I bought the "one man" valve spring compressor (also called overhead valve spring compressor) was for replacing the valve stem seals in my 2.7 (while doing the timing chain, water pump, and oil pump).
see, like i said, tools are cheaper than sending it out to be done. $100 for a tool saved $200 in labour, so you end up ahead, as long as you have the capability. plus the satisfaction of doing it yourself.
think i might look for that lisle one for work. sure i'll find a use for it soon enough. looks the most versatile for probably just about all ohc engines.